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Kim and Tiara F.

Kim, Tiara and their family have a deep bond – family is at the core of every decision they make. Having lived in Over-The-Rhine for a major chunk (for some, all) of their lives, they’ve experienced a lot of the changes firsthand. Whether the changes are positive or negative, they make it a priority to be joyful through it all. Tiara even said something during our time together that I choose to carry with me: 

 

‘I love being happy because happiness makes you live longer.’

 

ON GROWING UP IN CINCINNATI

KIM: I grew up in Madisonville, but always had family who lived in Over-The-Rhine, so I’ve got real deep connections to this place. She (Tiara) was born here – everybody was born in Cincinnati.

ON MOVING TO OVER-THE-RHINE

KF: Honestly, I didn’t have a choice. I was in the process of being homeless. I was staying with a friend of mine and couldn’t do it anymore. I had to find somewhere to go, so I found an apartment down on York St. I had to do something and that’s why we’re down here. Everything I did at that point in my life out of necessity.

ON THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO FINDLAY MARKET

KF: I remember my mom bringing me down here as a kid to go shopping. I didn’t live here directly at that point, but I had some family that did and so I spent a lot of time here. Now that we live here, I bring my family every now and then so they can get the same experience I did growing up. It’s really cool that I can bring it back full circle. I enjoy it.


TIARA: Yeah we’ve been here for quite a while now and have been able to watch this neighborhood change over the years. We’ve been coming to Findlay Market since I was little, and my kids are the 3rd generation of Fredericks that have been down in this area. It’s nice to be immersed in the culture.

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Yeah we’ve been here for quite a while now and have been able to watch this neighborhood change over the years. We’ve been coming to Findlay Market since I was little, and my kids are the 3rd generation of Fredericks that have been down in this area. It’s nice to be immersed in the culture.

What’s life without a little roller coaster? If we were always in the straight and narrow, it’d be boring, you know?

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People are more open to the neighborhood now. They’re less likely to believe the stories that they may have seen on TV or heard from somebody else about the Over-The-Rhine. They’re cleaning up—adding all the new apartments and stores—and changing the perception of this space. People are noticing and realizing that ‘ehh, it’s not as bad as it seems’.

ON NEIGHBORHOOD PERCEPTIONS

KF: I don’t mind it here: it’s a big change from how it used to be–it used to be a crime-ridden and most folks wouldn’t even walk down here. You didn’t see anything that you see now back in the day, so it’s come up a lot.


TF: People are more open to the neighborhood now. They’re less likely to believe the stories that they may have seen on TV or heard from somebody else about the Over-The-Rhine. They’re cleaning up—adding all the new apartments and stores—and changing the perception of this space. People are noticing and realizing that ‘ehh, it’s not as bad as it seems’.

ON NEIGHBORHOOD REDEVELOPMENT

TF: I try my best to keep a positive outlook on the situation. I think that we help the process by being here. You know, people see us out here–a young mother with her kids out by the market–and I think seeing that helps us set the example of who and how to interact in the neighborhood. People see us and realize that we’re apart of this community.

 

KF: I don’t mind you trying to reconstruct the area, but make it so that people can afford to be here. It seems like they’re trying to push the lower income people out by placing all of these $2000-$3000 condos around, and I don’t like that. I wish the city would include the community more on the decisions they’ve been making so that everyone can enjoy this place.

 

TF: I think the revamping is good. It’s not only bringing in work for some people, but it’s also making the neighborhood a little prettier. It’s both good and bad. We’re in the bad right now, but maybe in a few years things will be more affordable. I think by the time my kids are my age, the neighborhood will be 10 times better. I appreciate where we are, and as I keep bringing my kids down over the years, they’ll be able to watch it grow just like I have.

 

What’s life without a little roller coaster? If we were always in the straight and narrow, it’d be boring, you know?